Stormwater Management Permits

Excavator working on construction site
Silt fence protecting property and farm house in background
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Sediment and rock being tracking into roadway at construction site
Silt fence at construction site
Drop inlet protection reducing sediment into storm system
Green pollution running down storm drain
Stormwater management control pond with trees around it
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Coming soon! Online stormwater permit applications!

City Stormwater Management Permits are required for all land disturbances within the City of Kalispell. The requirements for the permit are established by land disturbance size: (1) less than one acre, and (2) greater than or equal to one acre. 

Fees: 

  • $10 Less Than an Acre 
  • $45 Greater than an Acre

Applications will be considered incomplete until the permit fee has been paid

Exempt Activities

The following activities are exempt from the requirement to obtain a City Stormwater Management Permit:

  • Emergencies posing an immediate danger to life or property, or substantial flood or fire hazards.
  • Any activity where the total volume of material disturbed, stored, disposed of or used as fill does not exceed five (5) cubic yards or the area disturbed does not exceed one thousand (1000) square feet provided it does not obstruct a watercourse and is not located in a floodplain.

Permit Forms and Related Ordinances

Excavator working on construction site

About Stormwater Management

Stormwater management is important for maintaining clean water and preserving streams, rivers, and lakes. The City of Kalispell's Storm Water Management Ordinance 1600 went into effect May 2, 2007, as mandated under the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Montana Pollution Discharge Elimination (MPDES) regulation. These regulations are designed to protect water quality in water bodies by reducing pollutants in stormwater that is carried into the storm conveyance systems and then into streams, rivers, and lakes.

Often construction begins with removal of vegetation and grading of the site. The lack of ground cover makes these sites especially vulnerable to soil erosion. Sediment-laden water can be washed off-site and into lakes and streams. The sediment reduces the amount of sunlight reaching aquatic plants and smothers bottom dwelling-insects and fish.